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A Bag of Marbles 2017

A Bag of Marbles | Un sac de billes | Z Paríze do Paríze


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A Bag of Marbles-Un sac de billes-Z Parize do Parize

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In occupied France, two young brothers, Joseph and Maurice, discover within themselves the courage, the bravery, and the mischief needed to escape the enemy's invasion and reunite with their lost family.

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About A Bag of Marbles 💬


This is the true story of two young Jewish brothers in German-occupied France who, with a mind-boggling mix of mischievousness, courage and ingenuity, will be forced to fend for themselves in order to survive the enemy invasion and try bring their family back together. The heartwarming adaptation of Joseph Joffo's enduring memoir tells the story of the Nazi occupation through the eyes of the two young Jewish boys.

Paris, 1941: Joseph (Dorian Le Clech) and Maurice (Batyste Fleurial) are the sons of Roman Joffo (Patrick Bruel), the local barber. At ages 10 and 12, the boys have so little understanding of the persecution of Jews that Joseph thinks nothing of swapping his yellow star for a bag of marbles. Despite their naiveté, Roman knows that their best chance to escape the Nazi roundup is to flee on their own to Vichy, France, where their older brothers Albert (Ilian Bergala) and Henri (César Domboy) have found a safe haven. Always one false move from tragedy, these tenacious children survive on courage, ingenuity, and more than a bit of cunning as they make their precarious way through France hoping to reunite with their family. More than anything, it's their brotherly bond that gets them through their ordeals. Patrick Bruel resonates as the Jewish family patriarch Roman, while newcomers Dorian Le Clech and Batyste Fleurial Palmieri register an almost agonizing vulnerability as hapless innocents trying to outrun the cruel machinery of war.

  • INTERVIEW WITH DIRECTOR CHRISTIAN DUGUAY

Q: HOW DID THIS ADVENTURE START FOR YOU?

Christian Duguay: I first had a very nice meeting with Nicolas Duval, Laurent Zeitoun, and Yann Zenou from Quad who wished to meet with me because they loved JAPPELOUP. All three of them passionately love cinema and are aware of the complexities that come with the job. When I find people that have global knowledge, from screenwriting to filmmaking, I'm happy. But when they asked me if I knew Un Sac de Billes by Joseph Joffo, I had to tell them that I had never read it. That being said, the book isn't very known in Québec. While reading it, I was shocked by the tenacity, the conviction, and the power behind this extremely hopeful story. It's a brilliant novel, shared through the children's point of view, about the world around them and how reality catches up to them. The story is so emotional, and unfortunately, so universal that it's impossible to not visually see and feel the actuality, the suffering, and sometimes, the happy moments and compare it to today's world.

Q: HOW DID THE MEETING WITH JOSEPH JOFFO GO?

Christian Duguay: With Joseph, we mostly talked about his father: in his voice, I understood what was happening behind the scenes of the actual book. Between the film, the book, and what Joffo told me, I began creating a link between Joseph and my filmmaking; we found the pieces of his father in all of my films, it was an automatic connection. For me, the father figure is celestial, it brings confidence. That being said, in the book, the father is mentioned, but he is not the main character in the novel.

Q: WHICH ANGLE DID YOU TAKE TO DIRECT THE ADAPTATION?

Christian Duguay: The book is written in the first person, but it is written 30 years after it actually happened. Contrarily, the movie presently utilizes the young boy's point of view. Doing so removes the hesitation seen from the narrator in the book. The film follows the primary, initial telling of events that are so monumental that it ends up showing the evolution of the characters.

Q: YOU KNOW A LOT ABOUT OCCUPIED FRANCE SINCE YOU'VE DIRECTED A FILM ON HITLER. HAVING THIS BACKGROUND, DID YOU FEEL AS THOUGH YOU DID NOT NEED TO DO AS MUCH RESEARCH ON THIS TIME PERIOD?

Christian Duguay: Evidently, I did a lot of work for HITLER and I know a lot of the political context, but I was still fascinated by the German Occupation in France. This political hierarchy and the division between those who kept their head down and those who rebelled fascinate me. To me, you had to feel history through the environment. For example, in the Niçoise scene, when we see the Italians quickly leaving France, we understand that the Germans have arrived. It's these kinds of details that allow us to not have to be so explicit. Once again, it's the universality of this story that has resonated with so many people. We've seen so many films focused on this time period, and what counts today is the justification of the emotions, which stay the same throughout history even if the decor changes.

Q: TALK TO ME ABOUT CASTING THE KIDS.

Christian Duguay: I had the chance to work with Valérie Espagne, an amazing casting director. She met over 1000 child actors and out of all of those kids I was mostly amazed by Dorian le Clech (Joseph) and Batyste Fleurial (Maurice).

And as luck would have it, they ended up having amazing chemistry between each other.

Dorian carries an intense spark in his eyes. For example, the scene with the slap, I had given him the lines and the directions, and the emotions came about naturally. All of a sudden, he understood what I was looking for in the role and he connected with my directions and the environment he had to portray. He had to live the scenes. Batyste had less experience than Dorian, but knew how hard he had to work in order to fit in the character's skin. He's a warm, kind person which I really appreciated and it was really shown throughout his character's role in the film. I explained to him the plot of the characters, weary of not trying to make him overthink the role; I wanted him to understand the script and its' details, giving him the power to imagine the role. All I did was give him a global explanation of the scenes' perspectives.

Q: HOW DID YOU DIRECT THEM?

Christian Duguay: Every night, we worked on the upcoming scenes to really explain and visually mark the evolution of their character.

They also received most of their help from Amour, their acting coach, who was amazing because even though she was guiding them, she still was very conscious of my goals for the film. She wanted the script to be natural, but not overplayed. So, she had them talk about their roles and recite them in every way, up until the script became naturally heartfelt and emotional. And at any moment, she would tell them, ''forget the text and draw inspiration from the person in front of you.'' Very often, professional actors stay focused on their lines and don't really take their partner into consideration. This definitely was not the case with Dorian or with Batyste.

Q: YOU ARE OFTEN THE CLOSEST ONE TO THE ACTORS.

Christian Duguay: Yes, for the most traumatizing moments of the film, I wanted us to really focus on the details. For example, the train scene, I shot with a macro lens to be as suffocating as possible and to really focus on two or three precise details. It's a close lens to the actors that leaves a lasting perspective and an oppressing point of view.

Q: THE MUSIC JUST SOUNDS LIKE IT'S WRITTEN BY ARMAND AMAR.

Christian Duguay: It's my second film with him after Belle and Sebastian. He knows that music is written to add to the drama and give a new emotion to the film. He was extremely generous and genuine. We had a real talk about the musical themes of the film. We had to create a theme prior to casting Elsa Zylberstein so she could listen and understand the need to be realistic in the way she played and held the violin. That being said, once we see her hold the instrument and the look of the children, we understand the history of the family. In A BAG OF MARBLES, the familiar environment is really important, so each time the parents and children reunite, we had to feel how happy they are together, and that comes through the music. This scene only lasts 10 seconds, but we immediately understand everything.

  • INTERVIEW WITH JOSEPH JOFFO

Q: HOW DID THE ADAPTATION COME TO LIGHT?

Joseph Joffo: I first had a wonderful meeting with the producer, Jean-Charles Lévy, which allowed me to meet Nicholas Duval from Quad. Right away, he was taken away by the project. After the adaptation by Jacques Doillon forty years ago, I really wanted someone to tell my story honestly. Christian Duguay shared images of great authenticity and I knew that my readers could relate to it emotionally and honestly.

Q: DID YOU MEET CHRISTIAN DUGUAY EARLY ON? HOW DID THIS MEETING GO?

Joseph Joffo: This meeting was such a pleasure! He first showed me his film JAPPELOUP which I really loved. Then, I saw his film about Hitler. No one really randomly makes a movie like that. He really seemed like a man who cared and was involved in the history of it all, and I wasn't wrong.

Q: WHAT DID YOU THINK ABOUT THE ACTORS?

Joseph Joffo: At first, I had some doubts about Patrick Bruel, but he's a huge actor and he portrayed my father in an extraordinary way. Elsa Zylberstein was amazing and Christian Clavier embodies Dr. Rosen's character so well, it almost made me forget about his part in ''Jacquouille la Fripouille.''

Q: AND THE KIDS?

Joseph Joffo: They presented exceptional conviction and determination. In the middle of winter, before the storms in Nice, they would walk in the rain without a problem. I spent a lot of time talking to them. They wanted to know if everything in the book was real. I told them that the book was actually a lot nicer than the actual truth because I wanted the book to show that the kids had a chance to get out. We have to leave a little hope for our readers, show them that with a lot of courage we can survive anything.

Q: HOW DID CHRISTIAN DIRECT THE KIDS?

Joseph Joffo: Christian loves his job and his greatest talent is his way of listening to people. He managed to direct them without making it feel like he was giving orders. Suddenly they anticipated his desires and were involved in the film.

Q: WHAT DID YOU FEEL THE FIRST TIME YOU SAW THE FILM?

Joseph Joffo: The first time I saw it, it was still in the editing stages. However, I got chills from feeling all these emotions and I cried. To me, Christian Duguay created the greatest film in his lifetime.

Q: DO YOU THINK HE'S CREATING A MESSAGE FOR TODAY'S PUBLIC?

Joseph Joffo: Today, the life I lived still strongly and heavily resonates with people today. Because of terrorism, children everywhere are forced to escape, too. Like us 50 years ago, they're found on the side of the roads, totally alone and left to fend for themselves. I hope the film inspires all of us to question the destiny of these poor kids and their destroyed families and fight for them.

  • INTERVIEW WITH ACTORS BATYSTE FLEURIAL PALMIERI & DORIAN LE CLECH

Q: HOW DID YOU GET ON THE PROJECT?

Dorian: I Studied a few scenes for an audition in Paris. At first, I was acting with another teen who was auditioning for Maurice. But, towards the end of the day, I met Batyste who get the part for Maurice - and the first scene we did together was the slap.

Batyste: We started the castings on our own and I, too, had studied the texts before auditioning. I got a ''call back'', I was first on set with another Joseph, and then Dorian. But the scene with Dorian was so good so they kept both of us.

Q: DID YOU KNOW ABOUT THE BOOK?

Dorian: I didn't know about it, so when I got the part. I read it with my mom. I was so impressed by Joseph, who was only 10 years old when he left with his brother. If I were in his place, I don't think that I would have been able to handle the free zone. Take the train, run away, walk for hours... it's incredible to see how much he went through at such a young age.

Batyste: I read the book in high school. When I first started on the film, we were given the book and an actual bag of marbles. I was really taken by the graphic novel. I couldn't really imagine how they would turn the book into a movie, but it really is such a beautiful story. Like Dorian said, I don't think I could have been capable of what Maurice and Joseph had to do.

Q: WHAT WAS YOUR REACTION WHILE READING THE SCRIPT?

Dorian: I felt that the script was really close to the actual book. For the movie, we added a bit of action, thriller, and complications, and love, and each aspect brought a special, personal touch to the film.

Batyste: I automatically understood the work that had to be done. And I knew that it was going to be hard. The script was really touching.

Q: CAN YOU TELL US YOUR INTERPRETATION OF THE FILM?

Dorian: It's a story about Joseph Joffo and his brother, Maurice, and their travels through France to get to the safe zone during World War II. Both of them will have to take difficult paths to get there. They meet nice people and people they should stay away from. And then, all of a sudden, everything changes when they find out that the Germans are taking over the safe zone.

Joseph and Maurice could be taken at any moment, so they try their best to hide. To be able to have some kind of stability, Maurice finds a job in a restaurant and Joseph lives with a family of booksellers and sells newspapers in return. When the Americans arrive in France, the Germans leave and the boys are free again. At the end, Joseph wants to tell Françoise, the booksellers' daughter, that he loves her, but it's too late.

Batyste: The story is about two young, Jewish boys who live in Paris with their family. When the time came for all of the Jewish community to wear the Star of David, Joseph and Maurice become victims of extreme bullying at school. Their parents beg them to flee and go to the safe zone to be free. They thought it was the best solution. Joseph and Maurice go back to Nice where their older brothers are. The parents also manage to find them. But once the Germans storm the south, the family has to separate again. One day, when they go out with Ferdinand, they're stopped by the Germans and tortured.

They only managed to escape once a priest intervenes and sets them free. They get back on their path and they end up in a village where both of the brothers find jobs.

Q: TALK TO ME ABOUT YOUR CHARACTERS.

Dorian: The two boys are very brave and smart. Joseph left his bag of marbles behind, kind of foreshadowing that he's leaving his old life behind. He's a lot younger than Maurice but somehow finds the courage to keep up with him. Across the story, he grows, gets stronger, and changes.

Batyste: Maurice takes advantage of his understanding of the situation and the risks of the war. His main focus is to protect his brother and make sure everything is safe. He's the leader. He grows too but from the start, he knew that he was going to face extreme difficulties such as: the separation with his family, the risk of being stopped by the Germans, the exhaustion, hunger, tiredness, traps to avoid, gun violence... Joseph is the youngest, so less weary and less careful.

Q: TO YOU, DO THEY CARRY THEIR FATHER'S COURAGE? FROM HIS EXPERIENCE?

Dorian: Yes, definitely from their father, very dignified and proud of his origins, which give the boys an enormous amount of courage. Joseph and Maurice learned everything from their father, they learned how to have endurance and to not give up. When they're tortured by the Germans, the brothers end up changing a lot. They understand how serious this is and they can't let their guard down.

Q: HOW WAS IT WORKING WITH CHRISTIAN DUGUAY?

Dorian: When we're on set, I never really focused on the camera and focused more on my role. I didn't really think as Dorian, I thought as Joseph Joffo. Thanks to Christian's advice, we were really able to get into character and really feel their emotions. And when the real emotions come forth, that's when it becomes magic.

Batyste: Christian didn't put too much pressure on us, he pushed us to be our best and to get in touch with our deepest emotions. He was always behind us, positively encouraging us. He was looking to see if we were ready to harness authentic emotion.

Q: HOW DID YOU FLIM THE SCENE WITH THE SLAP?

Dorian: It was the last emotional scene that we filmed. I was totally immersed in the subject and in the sequence. I knew what was going to happen since I had just shot all the other scenes. I knew exactly which emotion I had to put forth.

Q: HOW WAS THE MEETING WITH JOSEPH JOFFO?

Dorian: I met him in Nice. We got along very well. He encouraged me and told me ''you, you're a good kid and you actually look like me a lot!'' It gave me a little bit of a ''boost'' for the emotional scenes.

Batyste: I was excited and also nervous. I would often place myself in his shoes, the story is so strong and emotional. I remember one time he told me, ''I hope you’ll be as strong as Maurice!'' It kind of put some pressure on me.

Q: WHAT DO YOU WISH TO TELL KIDS YOUR AGE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE MOVIE?

Dorian: We see in the film that we deported many Jewish citizens but also other people as well. This film is a wake-up call to those and reminds people that at this period bombs were dropping all the time and we could die at any second.

Our teachers aren't always the best source at teaching history, wars, past events... Sometimes, we get bored in class and we don't really feel like learning... If we were really into history, we'd be able to care more about it. So, the movie really allows us to learn and care.

Batyste: We studied the Shoah at school, but we never really got into the personal stories of the lives involved. With the movie, we realize how much the Jewish community suffered. It's a film that really inspires and makes you realize what happened during the war families were separated, tortured, mass shootings by the Resistance, kids that were hiding, the terror of being found and killed. If I tell my friends to watch it, it's to make them realize the horror of this war.

It's hard to get kids to want to watch this movie. Teenagers think that they already learned about this in school, so they don't really care. But it's important to care.

  • INTERVIEW WITH ACTORS ELSA ZYLBERSTEIN & PATRICK BRUEL

Q: HOW DID YOU COME ABOUT THE PROJECT?

Elsa Zylberstein: I knew that the film was in progress through a friend who told me, ''This role is for you.'' And randomly, my agent asked me to have a meeting with Christian Duguay. Once I met him, I immediately got the feeling that we were going to get along. I really liked his energy and his way of looking at me. When he told me, ''You're too young, you're going to have to age a little to make it look like you've had four kids,'' I told him, ''No problem.'' I saw JAPPELOUP and thought it was amazing, especially in terms of filmmaking. Christian mixes the right amount of emotion that encompasses American cinema- character development, emotional expressions, flashbacks - and the intimate dimensions of European cinema. I knew that he would be able to tell the story of Joseph Joffo's family in a real, honest way with strong, enticing characters.

Patrick Bruel: It's Eric Tolédano that spoke to me about this project. Early on, Laurent Zeitoun and Nicolas Duval, from Quad, let me know that they really, really wanted me to participate in the project. I was hesitant at first, ''A Secret'' was still resonating with me, haven't I already done this kind of movie? Etc... And then I spoke with Christian Duguay, it was a turning point. Even though he's an extremely talented director with films that I adore, I told him one thing that was really important to me for this particular project: the casting of the two Joffo brothers. Because, there are plenty of films on World War II, but not many offer a point of view through the children's eyes. He then showed me Dorian's audition with the slap scene. I was more than taken, I was stunned! I've rarely seen an actor with so much talent. Yes, a kid is capable to act, and more importantly, capable to rehearse and practice a scene over and over again with still so much authenticity each time. I felt that something was going to happen with this director. And it was seen across this entire adventure.

Q: IS THIS A BOOK THAT YOU HAD HEARD ABOUT GROWING UP?

Elsa Zylberstein: This book was on my parent's bookshelf and I read it in high school. It really touched me, it stayed with me forever. My father's family, from Polish origins, arrived in France during the 30s and had to hide near Lyon during the war. Therefore, Joseph Joffo's story resonated across my entire family. While reading it, I was so upset because it's really through a kid's point of view during the 40s. Considering the events that are happening today in France, it's important to create films that are universal and understood by all different populations. Cinema allows us to share, demonstrate, and inform what schools or families don't.

And for an anecdote, my father knew the Joffos, he would do their hair in his hair salon!

Patrick Bruel: I read the book and saw the first film which was pulled the minute it came out. My mom felt really close to this book, like myself today. I hope that my kids and all other kids discover this story and it stays with them throughout their lives.

Q: PATRICK, HOW DID YOU MANAGE TO DEPICT THE FATHER'S CHARACTER? HE'S RESILIENT AND HEAVILY AFFECTED BY THE WEIGHT OF SUCH A TRAUMATIC LIFE, BUT HE'S ALSO SO LOVING AND KIND WITH HIS FAMILY.

Patrick Bruel: He is a reference, a good man, necessarily tormented because he is one step ahead of others. He senses what will happen and he has already overcome terrible trials: his escape during the pogroms. He knows that what happened in the past can come back and so he tries to anticipate. It was an unusual reaction, but essential in these moments. It took a lot of love, trust and this extraordinary relationship with his children so that he could guide them from a distance. He sends them to life: he gives them the keys to escape. It goes through a very painful event and therefore by this scene of slaps, very strong and very powerful to play. And also, when he's driving with them, we see that he understood that it's over for him, but that he wants to accompany his children to the end. I had the chance to carry this beautiful character... I love this role and what Christian, Elsa and the children allowed me to do.

Elsa Zylberstein: Christian gives out a lot of positive energy and generosity. He loves his actors and watches over them. He's not afraid of emotion. And everyone just trusts him.

Q: ELSA, HOW DID YOU MANAGE TO GET IN CHARACTER?

Elsa Zylberstein: I don't have any kids, so it wasn't an easy role. I first thought about a look and then I felt like I had to change constantly. I told myself that they were lost people, on the run, and therefore in constant insecurity. Everything was based on that. They also have a real sense of family. In wartime, it's their only purpose and it's all that counts.

When one is in survival, there is this urgency to live: even when they are happy, they still say, ''this may be the last time''. Naturally, with the children, there was a relationship full of tenderness. I did not have many scenes, but there is energy in each of them, whether internal tensions or happy sequences. I had to release the same intensity in each scene. I tried to work on loss and omnipresent anxiety.

Q: HOW WAS MEETING JOFFO?

Elsa Zylberstein: He was so excited to see that we were making a movie about his life. His wife spoke to me about the mom who constantly played the violin in the apartment. The ambiance was always warm. I immersed myself in all these details and it helped me build my character.

Patrick Bruel: He was so happy when he would come on set. He really hoped that I would play this role, it was important for him that the father character is loyal to his own father and his character traits. We formed a great relationship. He's a warm man. His enthusiasm fed our work. I will never forget his emotion at the end of the first screening and the words said to me. I felt that I have done more than just act.

Q: WE GENUINELY BELIEVE IN THIS COUPLE THAT LOVES EACH OTHER AND FIGHTS AGAINST THE ADVERSITY.

Elsa Zylberstein: Joseph Joffo's mother and father met at a very young age, they grew up together - she was probably around 17 years old. They knew all about each other: he read poems and she played the violin. They were artists.

Q: THE SEQUENCE OF THE POLICE OFFICERS WHO LAND IN THE APARTMENT IN NICE IS, QUITE HONESTLY, OF A STAGGERING FORCE. HOW DID IT HAPPEN?

Patrick Bruel: There is a moment where the roles switch: Suddenly childhood is erased and the whole family is awoken. Elsa becomes really strong. She decides to come to the rescue of her husband whom she feels vulnerable. She has this mixture of unconsciousness and intuition dictated by her history and her past.

Elsa Zylberstein: While her husband is being arrested by the police and is at risk of being arrested, she decides to come out of hiding to help answer police questions and hints. In this scene, we see her intelligence, her audacity, her consciousness. She takes incredible risks. I believe that in moments of survival, she is able to surpass herself. When a person has such calmness, it shows that they're ready for anything to save their family.

Patrick Bruel: It's interesting because we don't know everything that's going to happen during this war. We have to make quick choices and basically rely on instinct.

Q: TELL ME YOUR RELATIONSHIPS WITH CHILDREN.

Elsa Zylberstein: When we start a movie, we set up a requirement. For me, at the end of the scenes, I'm all in my emotions because I really slip into the skin of the character and really feel the character's emotions. The kids were always so upset to see me like that, all sad and emotional. Suddenly, my energy was influencing their game. When they observed me in direct emotion, they found that my commitment was total. They gave the best of themselves to live up to our demands as more experienced actors. And it was great. This complicity between us is tied very naturally.

Patrick Bruel: Very strong relationships... as if they were my own sons. That being said, they are very close to the age of my two children, but also because I grew really close to them. Our reunion during each of my returns on set was always really pleasant.

Dorian jumped at my neck, and Batyste gave me a nice smile and a good hug. I found them really kind. I saw them working and rehearsing: they're so good and really make the film. They adapt so easily to everything. And their coach, Amour, was great.

Q: DID YOU REHEARSE A LOT?

Elsa Zylberstein: We worked a lot at the table reads to get the best possible scenes. Christian is very attentive. For each sequence, we tried to set the right tone. Once Christian films several takes, he chooses what he wants to edit. He captures moments.

Q: DO YOU THINK THAT THIS FILM CAN TOUCH YOUNG GENERATIONS?

Elsa Zylberstein: I think that A BAG OF MARBLES is a beautiful film, popular in the good sense of the word, as are the big films of Claude Berri such as JEAN DE FLORETTE. This meaning of romance can help reach the public and interest the youngest generations.

Patrick Bruel: Well, that's the goal! It is a duty to remember. It is very important that this kind of film can be done and above all, be successful. Especially since the bar is high on the subject THE PIANIST, SCHINDLER'S LIST, REVEALS CHILDREN, A SECRET... Yes, it is necessary that the younger generations know this part of our history to understand that it can happen again.

Q: HOW WAS FILMING WITH CHRISTIAN DUGUAY?

Elsa Zylberstein: With Patrick, we were the parent couple. And Duguay, like Lelouch, is essential. I was very sensitive to this organic side. For the beach scene, we were all together: it's a very lively sequence with a lot of movement, where we were constantly genuine and honest. Christian wanted to portray real life, so he does not cut when the emotion rises. He has great sensitivity and there is something very carnal and tender in his cinema.

Patrick Bruel: We really found ourselves. The shooting was very intense. Christian Duguay has a sensitive soul and a lot of experience. It is a great asset for him to be in the frame because he is the first to watch his film. Christian follows his instinct and he chooses to finish the scene where his eyes take him: it is only then that he decides to cut. You have to be ready because anything can happen and I like that! I had very strong moments on this film thanks to our precious complicity.

A Bag of Marbles Movie Details 🎥


Directed by

Christian Duguay

Writing Credits

Alexandra Geismar and Jonathan Allouche (Original Screenplay)

Benoît Guichard and Christian Duguay (Screenplay, Adaptation & Dialogue)

Laurent Zeitoun (Collaboration)

Joseph Joffo (Novel)

Starring

Dorian Le Clech

Batyste Fleurial

Ilian Bergala

César Domboy

Patrick Bruel

Elsa Zylberstein

Bernard Campan

Kev Adams

Christian Clavier

Coline Leclère

Romain Paul

Emile Berling

Jocelyne Desverchère

Music by

Armand Amar

Cinematography by

Christophe Graillot

Genres: Adventure, Drama, Family

Countries: France, Canada, Czech Republic

A Bag of Marbles Official Trailer



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